Author Archives: Daniel Jolley

The 2015 general election and conspiracy theories

Millions of people in the United Kingdom will head to the polling stations on Thursday (7th May) to vote in the 2015 general election. There will however be a large portion of people, whilst eligible, will not cast their vote. … Continue reading

Posted in What's the harm | 14 Comments

Ebola virus conspiracy theories

“How do you think the Ebola virus come about?” Created in a lab (on purpose) – 47% Created in a lab (by accident) – 10% Spread from bats/monkeys – 38% Cannibalistic ritual cover-up – 5% This is a poll question … Continue reading

Posted in What's the harm | Tagged , , , | 14 Comments

Anti-vaccine conspiracy theories and their potential impact on children’s health

The Los Angeles Times recently published a piece titled: “Measles is spreading, and the anti-vaccine movement is the cause”, and as you can imagine, this caught my attention. Recently, I have had an empirical paper published in the open-access journal … Continue reading

Posted in Social psychology, What's the harm | 40 Comments

Should conspiracy theory research inform public policy?

Princess Diana was murdered by the Royal Family.  The U.S. government orchestrated the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  Pharmaceutical companies cover up evidence of harmful side effects of vaccines.  Each statement is a ‘conspiracy theory’; defined as a proposed plot by powerful … Continue reading

Posted in Social psychology | Tagged | 225 Comments

PsyPAG Quarterly special issue: The psychology of conspiracy theories

The PsyPAG Quarterly is a publication which is distributed free of charge to all psychology postgraduates in the UK. As an editor of this publication, for the September ’13 edition, I put together a special issue on the psychology of … Continue reading

Posted in Social psychology | 28 Comments

Childhood vaccinations: What is the role of conspiracy theorising?

On Wednesday 26th June 2013, I attended a thought-provoking symposium where international experts in psychology, anthropology and communication sciences came together to describe current trends in public attitudes towards childhood vaccination. The symposium accurately titled ‘Public engagement and risk communication … Continue reading

Posted in Events, Social psychology | 5 Comments

“The Great Green Con”: Pro-conspiracy information within the media

This morning I came across a news article that read so similar to my pro-conspiracy manipulation used within a recent paper, it was quite unnerving. I have spoken about this paper before on this blog, where it was shown that exposure … Continue reading

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Conspiracy beliefs and TV licences: ‘Turning off’ engagement

As blogged about previously, conspiracy theories are influential and exposure to such theories can influence both beliefs and behavioural intentions in a variety of domains. However, a recent news story caught my attention, as it clearly demonstrated a sense of detachment with … Continue reading

Posted in 9/11, Social psychology, What's the harm | Tagged , , | 6 Comments

The psychology of conspiracy theories: CSRfm’s brain bites podcast, with Dan Jolley & Mike Wood

On Tuesday 11th December 2012, Mike and I recorded a radio interview for CSRfm‘s Brain Bites show, based on the psychology of conspiracy theories. You can listen to the podcast of the show here:

Posted in Events | Tagged , | 6 Comments

The influence of conspiracy information: Beliefs & Intentions

Conspiracy theories are influential. Empirical work, both of my own and other scholars have indeed shown that this is the case. Whilst watching “Did we land on the moon” on channel 5 last night, I therefore wondered what influence this … Continue reading

Posted in Events, Social psychology | Tagged , , , , , , | 17 Comments